Idaho Press Carries Out Hatchet Job on Boise Mayoral Candidate

Early in the week of July 21, a packet of WikiLeaks documents hacked from Hilary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign was sent to the Idaho Press by an unnamed source.

The anonymous source alleged that Boise City Council President and mayoral candidate Lauren McLean is part of a “dark money” political fundraising effort to shield progressive donors from campaign finance laws that would require them to disclose their identities. McLean is campaigning to unseat Boise Mayor Dave Bieter, who is running for a fifth four-year term.

In support of the claimed election law violation, the “packet” included a March 2015 email to John Podesta, then-White House chief of staff. National Education Association director John Stocks had forwarded the email to Podesta, inviting him to a Ketchum meeting of the Idaho Progressive Investors Network, which McLean founded a decade ago. Stocks, a progressive organizer and Idaho state senator in the 1980s, is a member of McLean’s network.

Along with McLean’s meeting invitation, Stocks attached information about Better Idaho, a group that promotes progressive causes supported by several investors in McLean’s network.

On July 25, the Idaho Press headlined the story:

McLean defends political fundraising through organization she founded

The clear implication of the header is that McLean is on the defensive about her fundraising organization. You have to read on to learn that the emails are not about fundraising for her mayoral campaign but about work she did in her profession as an advisor to investors who want to fund progressive causes.

The story begins with this sensational lede:

City Council President and mayoral candidate Lauren McLean makes an appearance on the notorious website WikiLeaks, but she says it’s not in relation to any fundraising for political candidates or “dark money.”

The only actual appearance McLean makes (present tense) is her smiling photo above the lede in the online edition. Her forwarded emails made their appearance three years ago when WikiLeaks published the hacked contents of John Podesta’s computer.

Reading on, we learn that four years ago Stocks wanted to get Podesta to Idaho to take him on a hike in the Boulder-White Clouds roadless area to lobby then-president Barack Obama to designate the area as a national monument. Podesta never came.

In the rest of the story, McLean explains that neither her investors network nor Better Idaho raises funds for political candidates. Their purpose is to connect donors to Idaho causes they care about like education, public lands, and other issues affecting the state’s future. Because the work relates to clients’ financial decisions, members’ names are not published.

Gary E. Richardson is a former Idaho Public TV reporter/producer. He is not endorsing any Boise mayoral candidate but knows “dirty tricks” when he sees them.

The original Idaho Press story can be viewed at https://www.idahopress.com/news/local/mclean-defends-political-fundraising-through-organization-she-founded/article_4cd221e9-fd83-5cdd-a3be-05137128b991.html

Property Rights and the Right to the City

Property Rights and the Right to the City

I was recently rummaging through some old files looking for the above cartoon by Richard Guindon. Back in 1990, I had used it as the frontispiece for an essay I wrote about Idaho’s Land Use Planning Act. I was a conservationist on Boise’s first foothills planning committee. The Idaho Conservation League, which in 1977-78 had employed me as its first field organizer, had been instrumental in the enactment of the act in the mid-1970s, the new group’s first legislative victory.

In addition to “Let’s Read the Local Land Use Planning Act,” my rummaging brought up

From 1979 to 1981, I lived in the foothills about eight miles outside Boise, Idaho, as caretaker of the Hawkins Ranch, which sits out on a ridge a half-mile above the city. In 1981 I moved back into the city on N. 2nd St. less than a mile from the Fort Boise Military Reserve, the city’s first open-space reserve. In 1986 we bought a home adjacent to the reserve in Aldape Heights, one of Boise’s first foothills subdivisions.

There’s more to this story and our efforts to, once again, truly engage citizens in planning Boise’s future. TO BE CONTINUED

A bit of doggerel from the past

A graveyard worker sleeps

Posted on the door of my apartment when I worked the
night shift at the local 24-hour service station.
Lone Pine, California, 1975

A graveyard worker sleeps within,
Whose days are over when yours begin.
All night at Al’s ARCO he toils
Selling, while burning, the midnight oils.

This dubious commerce pays him well,
But without sleep his days are hell.
In order to amend this plight
He must convert his days to night.

He values friends who’re up all day
And hopes they feel a similar way.
So if you think your business’ll keep,
Come back later, and let him sleep.

But if, perchance, you’re from afar,
You just might find the door ajar.
Or if stalled plans just won’t work out,
You’re welcome, too, without a doubt.

If you leave, or decide to stay,
Remember this along the way:
As your days wane and his begin,
A graveyard worker stirs within.

Fourth of July Salute to America

Donald Trump has announced plans for a “Salute to America” at the Lincoln Memorial on July 4th this year, which some see as another taxpayer-financed campaign rally sure to bring out his “base.” In his usual terse, demure prose, Trump has tweeted that the event will have “Major fireworks display, entertainment and an address by your favorite President, me!”

Proudly They Came (1): 1970


The album cover of Honor America Day recordings of the event that was largely seen as a pro-war, pro-Nixon rally held July 4, 1970 in Washington, D.C. The album contains an iconic version of Kate Smith’s God Bless America, but does not recognize protests at the event against the Vietnam War and for legalization of marijuana.

I can’t help but recall the July 4th “Honor America Day” at that location 49 years ago. It was a massive, entertainment-filled, patriotic ceremony kicked off in the morning with an interfaith service on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial led by Billy Graham and attended by some 10,000 people. The day’s planning committee was led by J Willard Marriott, the hotel-chain baron and friend of President Nixon. Bob Hope was the master of ceremonies. 


American evangelist Billy Graham speaks from a podium on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial while surrounded by uniformed members of the armed forces during ‘Honor America Day,’  in Washington, DC on July 4, 1970.
David Fenton/Getty Images

In spite of campaign promises to end the war in Vietnam, President Nixon had expanded the war with the carpet-bombing and invasion of Cambodia. In the fall of 1969, the largest antiwar protest ever held in the United States drew hundreds of thousands to the nation’s capital. The antiwar movement continued to grow, particularly after National Guard soldiers in May 1970 killed four students attending an antiwar protest at Kent State in Ohio and two at Jackson State in Mississippi.

When Nixon supporters kicked off their Honor America celebration at one end of the National Mall ostensibly to express a sense of national unity and patriotism, many felt it was little more than a pro-war rally. From the reflecting pool to the Washington Monument at the other end of the mall, several thousand hippies and Yippies gathered for what was to become an annual Smoke-In to demand legalization of marijuana and the end to the war.

Proudly They Came (2): 1970

Four years ago, over objections from Congress, recreational marijuana was legalized in the District of Columbia. We can be certain that this year’s smoke-in will offer an interesting contrast to the Trump-sponsored Salute at the Lincoln Memorial.